Intellon Network & Wireless Cards Driver Download

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Home networking standards
Common nameIEEE standard
HomePlug
HD-PLC
1901
Wi-Fi802.11a
802.11b
802.11g
802.11n
802.11ac
Common nameITU-T recommendation
HomePNA 2.0G.9951–3
HomePNA 3.1/HomeGridG.9954
G.hn/HomeGridG.9960 (PHY)
G.hn/HomeGridG.9961 (DLL/MAC)
G.hn/HomeGridG.9962 (Management Plane)
G.hn-mimoG.9963
G.hn/HomeGridG.9964 (PSD Management)
G.hntaG.9970
G.cxG.9972

A WLAN, or wireless local area network, uses radio signals to connect nearby devices, such as a computer to a wireless printer. This type of wireless network is based on 802.11 networking standards set by the IEEE, who sets standards for a range of technological protocols.

HomePlug is the family name for various power line communications specifications under the HomePlug designation, with each offering unique performance capabilities and coexistence or compatibility with other HomePlug specifications.

Some HomePlug specifications target broadband applications such as in-home distribution of low data rate IPTV, gaming, and Internet content, while others focus on low power, low throughput, and extended operating temperatures for applications such as smart power meters and in-home communications between electric systems and appliances. All of the HomePlug specifications were developed by the HomePlug Powerline Alliance, which also owns the HomePlug trademark.

  1. In a simple home network, the Internet gateway router connects via Ethernet cable to a powerline adapter, which in turn plugs into a nearby power outlet. A second adapter, plugged into any other outlet in the home, connects via Ethernet cable to any Ethernet device (e.g., computer, printer, IP phone, gaming station). Communications between the.
  2. Just to round out the list of alternatives, there's IEEE 802.11b used in wireless local area network (WLAN) equipment-most notably Apple's AirPort. Intel has a competitive system as well as others that run at 11 Mbits/sec. IEEE 802.11a will bring the speed up to 54 Mbits/sec.

On 18 October 2016, the HomePlug Alliance announced that all of its specifications would be put into the public domain and that other organizations would be taking on future activities relating to deployment of the existing technologies.[1] There was no mention in the announcement of any further technology development within the HomePlug community.

History[edit]

The HomePlug Powerline Alliance was formed to develop standards and technology for enabling devices to communicate with each other, and the Internet, over existing structure/house electrical wiring.

One of the greatest technical challenges was finding a way to reduce sensitivity to the electrical noise present on power lines. HomePlug solved this problem by increasing the communication carrier frequencies so that the signal is conveyed by the neutral conductor, which is common to all phases.

The first HomePlug specification, HomePlug 1.0, was released in June 2001. The HomePlug AV (for audio-video) specification, released in 2005, increased physical layer (PHY) peak data rates from approximately 13.0 Mbit/s[2] to 200 Mbit/s. The HomePlug Green PHY specification was released in June 2010 and targets Smart Energy and Smart Grid applications as an interoperable 'sibling' to HomePlug AV with lower cost, lower power consumption and decreased throughput.[3]

In 2010, the IEEE 1901 was approved and HomePlug AV, as baseline technology for the FFT-OFDM PHY within the standard, and became an international standard. The HomePlug Powerline Alliance is a certifying body for IEEE 1901 products. The three major specifications published by HomePlug (HomePlug AV, HomePlug Green PHY and HomePlug AV2) are interoperable and compliant.[4]

In 2011, the HomePlug Green PHY specification was adopted by Ford, General Motors, Audi, BMW, Daimler, Porsche, and Volkswagen, as a connectivity standard for Plug-In Electrical Vehicle.[5]

As of 2017, there are at least six chip vendors shipping HomePlug AV chipsets with IEEE 1901 specification support: Broadcom, Qualcomm Atheros, Sigma Designs, Intellon, SPiDCOM, and MStar.[6]

Newer versions of HomePlug support the use of Ethernet in bus topology via OFDM modulation, which enables several distinct data carriers to coexist in the same wire. Also, HomePlug's OFDM technology can turn off (mask) any sub-carriers that overlap previously allocated radio spectrum in a given geographic region, thus preventing interference. In North America, for instance, HomePlug AV only uses 917 of 1155 sub-carriers.[7]

Usage[edit]

Powerline networking in general means a network can be set up using a building's existing electrical wiring. For electric vehicle charging, the SAE J1772 standard plug-in electric vehicle charger also requires HomePlug Green PHY to establish communications over a powerline before the vehicle can begin to draw any charging power.

All commercial HomePlug implementations meet the AES-128 encryption standard specified for advanced metering infrastructure by the US FERC. Accordingly, these devices are suitable to deploy as utility grade meters off the shelf with appropriate software.

As of late 2012, the most widely deployed HomePlug devices are 'adapters', which are standalone modules that plug into wall outlets (or power strips [but not surge protectors] or extension cords) and provide one or more Ethernet ports. In a simple home network, the Internet gateway router connects via Ethernet cable to a powerline adapter, which in turn plugs into a nearby power outlet. A second adapter, plugged into any other outlet in the home, connects via Ethernet cable to any Ethernet device (e.g., computer, printer, IP phone, gaming station). Communications between the router and Ethernet devices are then conveyed over existing home electrical wiring. More complex networks can be implemented by plugging in additional adapters as needed. A powerline adapter may also be plugged into a hub or switch so that it supports multiple Ethernet devices residing in a common room.

Increasingly, the functionality found in standalone adapters is being built into end devices such as power control centers, digital media adapters, and Internet security cameras. It is anticipated that powerline networking functionality will be embedded in TVs, set-top boxes, DVRs, and other consumer electronics, especially with the emergence of global powerline networking standards such as the IEEE 1901 standard, ratified in September 2010.[8]

Several manufacturers sell devices that include 802.11n, HomePlug and four ports of gigabit ethernet connectivity for under US$100. Several are announced for early 2013 that also include 802.11ac connectivity, the combination of which with HomePlug is sold by Qualcomm Atheros as its Hy-Fi hybrid networking technology, an implementation of IEEE P1905. This permits a device to use wired ethernet, powerline or wireless communication as available to provide a redundant and reliable failover – thought to be particularly important in consumer applications where there is no onsite expertise typically available to debug connections.

Intellon

Versions[edit]

HomePlug 85 Mbit/s adapter

HomePlug 1.0[edit]

The first HomePlug specification, HomePlug 1.0, provides a peak PHY-rate of 14 Mbit/s. It was first introduced in June, 2001 and has since been replaced by HomePlug AV. On May 28, 2008 Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) incorporated HomePlug 1.0 powerline technology into the newly published TIA-1113 international standard. TIA-1113 defines modem operations on user-premises electrical wiring. The new standard is the world's first multi-megabit powerline communications standard approved by an American National Standards Institute (ANSI)-accredited organization.[citation needed]

The HomePlug 1.0 MAC Layer uses channel access based on Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA) to transport data from 46 to 1500 bytes long from encapsulated IEEE 802.3 frames as MAC Service Data Units (MSDUs) (so doesn't support jumbo frames).

HomePlug 1.0 Turbo adapters comply with the HomePlug 1.0 specification but employ a faster, proprietary mode that increases the peak PHY-rate to 85 Mbit/s. HomePlug 1.0 Turbo modems were only available from Intellon Corporation.

HomePlug AV[edit]

The HomePlug AV specification, which was introduced in August 2005, provides sufficient bandwidth for applications such as HDTV and VoIP. HomePlug AV offers a peak data rate of 200 Mbit/s at the physical layer, and about 80 Mbit/s at the MAC layer. HomePlug AV devices are required to coexist, and optionally to interoperate, with HomePlug 1.0 devices. The physical layer uses OFDM carriers spaced at 24.414 kHz, with carriers from 2 to 30 MHz. Depending on the signal to noise ratio, the system automatically selects from BPSK, QPSK, 16 QAM, 64 QAM, 256 QAM, and 1024 QAM, on a carrier by carrier basis.

Utilizing adaptive modulation on up to 1155 OFDM sub-carriers, turbo convolution codes for error correction, two-level MAC framing with ARQ,[9] and other techniques, HomePlug AV can achieve near the theoretical maximum bandwidth across a given transmission path.[7] For security reasons, the specification includes key distribution techniques and the use of 128 bit AES encryption. Furthermore, the specification's adaptive techniques present inherent obstacles to eavesdropping and cyber attacks.[10][11]

Intellon Network Activate

Some Qualcomm Atheros-based adapters comply with the HomePlug AV specification but employ a proprietary extension that increases the PHY-rate to 500 Mbit/s primarily by using a wider spectrum.[12]

HomePlug AV2[edit]

The HomePlug AV2 specification was introduced in January 2012. It is interoperable with HomePlug AV and HomePlug GreenPHY devices and is IEEE 1901 standard compliant. It features gigabit-class PHY-rate, support for MIMO PHY, repeating functionalities and power saving modes.[4][13] It can additionally use the band from 30 to 86 MHz. The first generation are generally considered to be 20% faster than HomePlug AV 500, it is often sold as HomePlug 600. They do not support MIMO, but only single streams due to the Atheros chipset architecture (QCA7450/AR1540). October 2013 Qualcomm announced the QCA7500 with support for 2x2 MIMO which supposedly will double data transfer rates. In 2014, Qualcomm began production of the QCA7500. This device provided raw PHY rates of 1300 Mbps, with resultant data rates of 550 Mbps UDP and 500 Mbps TCP, full MIMO. Communication takes place on both the line–neutral and line–ground power line pairs. Devolo from Germany has made proprietary improvements on the standard, and are using the ground wire in addition to phase (also known as hot or live) and null (also known as neutral). This technology is available world wide, though can only be used in territories that use the ground wire in their building wiring regulations.

HomePlug Green PHY[edit]

The HomePlug Green PHY specification is a subset of HomePlug AV that is intended for use in the smart grid. It has peak rates of 10 Mbit/s and is designed to go into smart meters and smaller appliances such as HVAC thermostats, home appliances and plug-in electric vehicles[14] so that data can be shared over a home network and with the power utility. High capacity broadband is not needed for such applications; the most important requirements are low power and cost, reliable communication, and compact size. GreenPHY uses up to 75% less energy than AV.[14]

The HomePlug Powerline Alliance worked with utilities and meter manufacturers to develop this 690-page specification.[15] HomePlug Green PHY devices are required to be fully interoperable with devices based on HomePlug AV, HomePlug AV2 and IEEE 1901 specification, which is considered[by whom?] to hamper their power consumption and cost reduction. The HomePlug silicon vendor QualComm announced commercially available Green PHY silicon on December 2011.[16]

HomePlug GreenPHY is the communication protocol used in the international electric vehicle charging standard CCS

HomePlug Access BPL[edit]

Access Broadband Power Line (BPL) refers to a to-the-home broadband access technology. The HomePlug Alliance formed the HomePlug Access BPL Working Group, whose first charter was to develop the Market Requirements Document (MRD) for a HomePlug Access BPL specification. The Alliance made an open invitation to the BPL industry to participate in the development of or provide input for consideration in the MRD. After several months of collaboration between utilities, ISPs and other BPL industry groups, the MRD was completed in June 2005. HomePlug's work on the Access BPL was subsequently contributed and merged into the IEEE 1901 standard.[3]

Security[edit]

Since signals may travel outside the user's residence or business and be eavesdropped on, HomePlug includes the ability to set an encryption password. The HomePlug specification requires that all devices are set to a default out-of-box password – although a common one. Users should change this password. If the password is not changed, an attacker can use their own homeplug device to detect the users signals, and then use the default password to access and change settings such as the encryption key used.

On many new powerline adapters that come as a boxed pair, a unique security key has already been established and the user does not need to change the password, except when using these with existing powerline adapters, or adding new adapters to an existing network. Some systems support an authenticate button, allowing adapters to be added to the network with just two button presses (one of each of the devices).

To simplify the process of configuring passwords on a HomePlug network, each device has a built-in master password, chosen at random by the manufacturer and hard-wired into the device, which is used only for setting the encryption passwords. A printed label on the device lists its master password.

Network

The HomePlug AV standard uses 128-bit AES, while the older versions use the less secure DES protocols. This encryption has no effect on the data the user sends or receives, and therefore higher level protocols and systems like TLS should still be used.

Since HomePlug devices typically function as transparent network bridges, computers running any operating system can use them for network access. However, some manufacturers only supply the password-setup software in a Microsoft Windows version; in other words, enabling encryption requires a computer running Windows [1]. Once the encryption password has been configured, any device supporting the ethernet specification will work on the adapter.

Interoperability[edit]

HomePlug AV, GP and AV2 are fully interoperable, and will also interoperate with IEEE 1901 devices. HomePlug 1.0 devices do not interoperate with HomePlug AV devices. Although it is technically possible to achieve such backward compatibility, doing so is not economically feasible because of the high cost of circuitry that would have to support different forward error correction (FEC) techniques and feature sets.[17]

HomePlug devices will not interoperate with devices that employ other powerline technologies, such as Universal Powerline Association (UPA), HD-PLC, or G.hn. In the case of G.hn, it was deemed prohibitively expensive to implement both HomePlug's turbo codingforward error correction and G.hn's low density parity check (LDPC).[18] However, IEEE 1901 allows co-existence within the same deployment of both HomePlug AV and HD-PLC via its Inter-System Protocol (ISP). G.hn also supports the ISP.

HomePlug devices are not compatible with certain power strips, surge protectors, and uninterruptible power supplies incorporating filters, which block the high-frequency signal. In such cases, the installer must plug devices directly into building electrical receptacles.[19] If a spare power point is not available, a double adapter can be used in many cases with the incompatible device on one side and the HomePlug device on the other.

EMI concerns[edit]

One of the concerns with all powerline systems, when compared to dedicated data wiring, is that the route of the wiring is not known in advance, and is generally already optimized for power transmission. This means that there will be situations where the system will radiate a significant fraction of the energy, in the form of radio frequency interference, or be vulnerable to the ingress of external signals. Given that the shortwave band is used both by low-power long-range telemetry and high-power broadcast signals, this is a potentially serious drawback. To attempt to minimize the effects of incoming interference and frequency-dependent path losses, the HomePlug standard requires each node to maintain 'tone maps' updates during operation, so the equipment 'learns' to avoid certain troublesome frequencies and to put more data onto those frequencies that exhibit a low loss. However, while this mitigates against ingress, if there is sensitive receiving equipment nearby then there is no easy way to tell the HomePlug apparatus to 'turn down' the radiated interference. In comparison to the received signals in a radio communication equipment, the signal levels in a powerline system are quite high. Typically the power density is −50dBm per Hz, as each carrier occupies a channel of 24 kHz, each carrier is injected at a level of −6.6dBm (220 microwatts), making the total full channel power 24dBm, (250 milliwatts). Typical short wave radio receiver sensitivities are at −100dBm (tenths of a picowatt) level.

In the UK there have been suggestions that users of powerline equipment should be prosecuted under the Wireless Telegraphy Act, if they cause interference to official radio systems.[20] Also GCHQ has published concerns that such interference affects its ability to monitor radio activity in the UK.[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^'Archived copy'. Archived from the original on 2017-01-07. Retrieved 2017-01-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^M. K. Lee, R. E. Newman, H. A. Latchman, S. Katar and L. Yonge. 'HomePlug 1.0 Powerline Communication LANs - Protocol Description and Performance Results'(PDF). International Journal of Communication Systems.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ ab“Frequently Asked Questions,” HomePlug Powerline Alliance, http://www.homeplug.org/about/faqs/Archived 2014-03-31 at the Wayback Machine (accessed June 22, 2010).
  4. ^ abYonge; Larry; Abad, Jose; Afkhamie, Kaywan; Guerrieri, Lorenzo; Katar, Srinivas; Lioe, Hidayat; Pagani, Pascal; Riva, Raffaele; Schneider, Daniel M.; Schwager, Andreas. (February 2014). 'chapter 14'. In Berger, Lars T.; Schwager, Andreas; Pagani, Pascal; Schneider, Daniel M. (eds.). HomePlug AV2: Next-generation Broadband over Power Line. CRC Press. pp. 391–426. doi:10.1201/b16540-18. ISBN9781466557529. Archived from the original on 2014-05-19.
  5. ^Seven Auto Manufacturers Collaborate on Harmonized Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Solution, 'Archived copy'. Archived from the original on 2012-03-08. Retrieved 2012-03-08.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^Alliance, HomePlug Powerline. 'HomePlug HomePlug Products'. Homeplug.org. Retrieved 2017-01-01.
  7. ^ abKatar, S.; Krishnam, M.; Newman, R.; Latchman, H. (August 2006). 'Harnessing the potential of powerline communications using the HomePlug AV Standard'(PDF). RF Design: 16–26. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2009-02-19. Retrieved 2008-01-06.
  8. ^'IEEE P1901 Working Group'. Grouper.ieee.org. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  9. ^Katar, Srinivas; Yonge, Larry; Newman, Richard; Haniph Latchman. 'Efficient Framing and ARQ for High-Speed PLC systems'(PDF). Retrieved 2008-01-07.Cite journal requires journal= (help)
  10. ^Newman, Richard; Yonge, Larry; Gavette, Sherman; Anderson, Ross. 'HomePlug AV Security Mechanisms'(PDF). Retrieved 2008-01-06.Cite journal requires journal= (help)
  11. ^Newman, Richard; Gavette, Sherman; Yonge, Larry; Anderson, Ross. 'Protecting Domestic Power-line Communications'(PDF). Retrieved 2008-01-06.Cite journal requires journal= (help)
  12. ^Higgins, Tim. 'HomePlug AV 500 Adapter Roundup - SmallNetBuilder'. Smallnetbuilder.com. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  13. ^HomePlug AV2 TechnologyArchived 2012-11-03 at the Wayback Machine, Homeplug.org
  14. ^ abHomePlug GreenPHY OverviewArchived 2015-10-25 at the Wayback Machine Groups.homeplug.com
  15. ^HomePlug GreenPHY Specs Homeplug.org
  16. ^'Qualcomm Atheros Launches World's First HomePlug Green PHY Solution'. Qualcomm.com. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  17. ^EDNArchived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, Voices: Intellon’s Mark Hazen on the HomePlug AV powerline-networking alternative
  18. ^Rick Merritt (March 25, 2009). 'Debate breaks out over home net standards'. EE Times. Retrieved December 23, 2013.
  19. ^Belkin (2008). 'Powerline Networking Adapters: User Manual'(PDF). p. 4. Retrieved 16 September 2012.[permanent dead link]
  20. ^Williams, Christopher (15 May 2018). 'You could be prosecuted if your broadband interferes with radio signals'. Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  21. ^Williams, Christopher (17 May 2011). ''Threat to GCHQ spying' from broadband networks'. Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 15 May 2018.

External links[edit]

Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=HomePlug&oldid=1004416388'

What is a LAN?

LAN stands for Local Area Network. It is a network that we can install on 2 or more computers and allows these computers to talk directly with each other. It is kind of like the internet, but on a much smaller scale. The internet allows us to connect with computers all over the globe, while a LAN is limited to a small area, such as a home or office.

LANs are used by businesses as well as personal users to upgrade the capacity for information transfer, as well as share utilities such as a printer or an internet connection. Through a LAN you can also directly connect computers in order to play in multiplayer computer games, such as Half-Life or WarCraft III.

When the computers are connected, there are two primary types of connections. The first of these is a client/server network. What this means is that one computer is the server, which hosts the majority of the information and directs all info. If you have five computers on a client/server network, any computer must first talk to the server to talk with any of the other client computers.

Intellon Network Services

It is contrasted by the peer-to-peer network, where all computers are equal in the connection, and any computer can talk directly to any other computer. If your system only has two or three machines, the difference between these two network types is minimal.

Intellon Network App

A LAN requires two components: hardware and a software component. The hardware is the actual physical connection that allows your computers to communicate with each other. The software component involves the proper configuring of the two systems so that they are in sync with each other once we create the physical connection.

Options for Connecting Your LAN

When it comes to the actual hardware involved in setting up a LAN in your home, there are many different options available for you. They are:

  • An Ethernet Connection (Computers are directly connected either through an ethernet hub or using crossover ethernet cable)
  • Powerline Networking (Computers talk to each other through power lines)
  • Phone line Networking (Computers talk to each other through phone lines)
  • Wi-Fi (Wireless Networking)

Each of these options is very different, and require very different hardware to install. However, once we complete the hardware installation, the configuring of the computer’s software to talk to each other is the same process no matter what kind of connection you have.

Installing a LAN Using an Ethernet Connection

If your computers are in relative proximity to each other, either in the same room or in a place where wires will not have to run very far, an Ethernet connection may be your best choice for connecting your LAN.

Ethernet and exceptionally Fast Ethernet connections have higher transfer rates than most of the other connection types. (Fast Ethernet can transfer information at a speed of 100 Mb/s!). However, unless the computers are nearby, it might be awkward or even impossible connect computers over ethernet without hardwiring cables into the walls.

An ethernet connection is the most direct networking connection option. Generally, a single wire is used to connect one computer to the other. It is called a crossover ethernet cable.

An ethernet cable is five separate wires twisted with each other. At both ends of the cables are jacks where these wires connect into a port, similar to a phone jack. (An ethernet jack is also approximately the same size as a phone jack).

When the wires come out of the cable in the same order they entered the cable; then this is a straight ethernet cable. If the end wires are in opposite order from the beginning wires (or crossed over), then we have a crossover ethernet cable. For a direct cable ethernet connection to work, you must have a crossover ethernet cable.

Connecting the computers is simple with a crossover ethernet cable. Firstly you must make sure that there are ethernet ports on both machines. Many computers these days come with an ethernet port as standard. To check, look at the back of your computer. The ethernet port looks just like a phone jack for a modem line but has an emblem beside it with three computers connected to each other.

If you do not already have ethernet ports on your computers, you will have to install them. Ethernet ports are cheap and cost about $25. Most ethernet ports connect to a PCI slot inside your machine.

If you have three or more computers in the same room you want to connect; you will need an ethernet hub. It is a little box that allows you to connect straight ethernet cables to it from each computer. It will direct all information over the LAN.

Power Line Networking

If you have computers spread across the house, then powerline networking is a cheap and easy way to connect your computers. Rather than having a direct wire connection between each machine, computers get the connection to a particular power adapter in your power outlet, and data travels between computers via the power lines already existing in your home.

There are two main competitors in the power line networking field. One is Intelogis, which offers its Passport technology to connect computers. The other is Intellon, whose technique is called Power Packet.

The two cost about the same, and are about the same quality although Power Packet is somewhat faster than Passport. Passport products generally connect to your computer through the parallel port (the same place your printer is hooked up), while Power Packet products connect either through USB or Ethernet ports.

Intellon Network Manager

Deciding which of these two solutions to use is entirely up to you. The cost is generally between $60 and $80 for either one to connect two computers. (Cost increases if you wish to connect more than two computers via this method).

Installation is simple. You must install the software that allows the computer to recognize the new connections, then plug in the cables into either your parallel port or your USB port. These cables then plug into a special power adapter into your power outlet. Once we connect the wires on both computers, we can set up our LAN.

Powerline networking also allows for the connection of a printer through the power lines. It is particularly useful with Intelogis’s product, as it can be difficult to hook up your printer if you only have one parallel port on each machine.

Phone Line Networking

Phone line networking is similar to power line networking in that it uses already existing wiring in your home to connect computers. Rather than using power lines, however, it uses phone lines.

To connect your computers to a wall-jack, you must either have a special phone networking card installed in your computer (a regular modem jack won’t work) or have a phone line adapter that will allow you to plug in the phone wire into another port. Most phone networking products use cards that must have in your machine (making phone networking more difficult that powerline networking).

Once you have your card installed or your adapter ready, you need merely plug in all computers into the nearest phone jack, and they will then be able to be configured for your LAN. (Note that if you have two or more lines in your home, the computers should have the connection to the same phone line).

Wi-Fi Networking

The newest technology in the networking field is wireless networking or Wi-Fi. With Wi-Fi, you require no cords, cables or lines at all. Computers talk to each other via radio signals.

Computers cannot talk directly to each other via a Wi-Fi network; however, they must have a router in between them. It is a small box that you plug in at some location and is generally also where you plug in your DSL or cable internet connection if you want to share internet between computers.

The router has a range of about 100 feet, which should cover most every area in your house. The signal sent by the router is not affected by floors, ceilings, walls, doors, etc., so you do not need direct line of sight between computers and the router.

Once you have your router installed, you must have your wireless adapters installed into your computers. These adapters generally plug into either a USB or ethernet port. Once router and adapters are in place, you are ready to set up your LAN on your computers.

Configuring Your LAN

Intellon Network Connection

Once the actual hardware connections are in place, the next step in installing your LAN is setting your computers to talk to each other. We will discuss how to do this process in Windows.

To begin, you must open your Control Panel. Once in the Control Panel, you want to go to Networking Options (Or Network and Internet Connections). Click on the Setup or change Home or Office Network, and this will open up a wizard that allows you to configure your new LAN.

When you go to configure your LAN, you must make sure that all computers you are attempting to connect are on, and that if you are going to share an internet connection that this connection is active.

The wizard will then automatically check your network both for computers on the net and for the shared internet connection. You will have to choose a host computer from which the internet connection is to be shared (the computer that has the internet connection). The host computer should be the computer that you first configure for the LAN.

After that, the wizard will direct you through any other processes that might be required. It is very rapid and straightforward. Afterward, you must log onto the other computers and configure the LAN there as well.

Once you have finished the configurations, you are ready to start using your LAN!